International Response

China has secret jail in Dubai, holds Uyghur

by Admin - Aug 21, 2021 0 Comment

China has secret jail in Dubai, holds Uyghur

 

Abliz poskim, August 21, 2021

 

 

A young Chinese woman has claimed she was held for eight days at a secret detention centre run by her country in Dubai with at least two Uyghur Muslims.

It may be the first evidence that China is operating a ‘black site’ – or secret jail where prisoners are not usually charged and have no legal protection – beyond its borders.

Wu Huan, 26, was on the run in Dubai trying to avoid extradition to her home country because her fiance is considered a dissident there.

Miss Wu said she was abducted from a hotel in the emirate and detained by Chinese officials at a villa converted into a jail. 

She was questioned and threatened in Chinese and forced to sign legal documents incriminating her fiance for harassing her, she said. She was finally released on June 8 and is now seeking asylum in the Netherlands.

 

While ``black sites'' are common in China, Wu's account is the only testimony known to experts that Beijing has set one up in another country. Such a site would reflect how China is increasingly using its international clout to detain or bring back citizens it wants from over ..

 

Dubai has a history as a place where Uyghurs are interrogated and deported back to China, and activists say Dubai itself has been linked to secret interrogations. Radha Stirling, a legal advocate who founded the advocacy group Detained in Dubai, said she has worked with about a dozen people who have reported being held in villas in the UAE, including citizens of Canada, India and Jordan but not China.

 

 

Wu was taken to her own cell, with a heavy metal door, a bed, a chair and a white fluorescent light that was on all day and night. She said she was questioned and threatened several times in Chinese.

 

She saw another prisoner, a Uyghur woman, while waiting to use the bathroom once, she said. A second time, she heard a Uyghur woman shouting in Chinese, ``I don't want to go back to China, I want to go back to Turkey.'' Wu identified the women as Uyghurs, she said, based on their distinctiv .

Its existence would reflect how China is increasingly using its international clout to detain or bring back citizens it wants from overseas, whether they are dissidents, corruption suspects or ethnic minorities such as Uyghurs.